Deferred taxation

Deferred taxation refers to the postponement of tax payments on income or gains to future periods, typically resulting in a temporary difference between taxable income reported for financial accounting purposes and taxable income reported for tax purposes.
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Updated: Jun 7, 2024

Key Takeaways

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  1. Deferred taxation involves the postponement of tax payments on income or gains to future periods, creating a temporary difference between taxable income for financial accounting and tax purposes.
  2. Deferred taxation arises from the use of different accounting methods and recognition criteria for financial reporting and tax purposes, leading to timing differences in the recognition of income, expenses, assets, and liabilities.
  3. Deferred taxation can have significant implications for financial statement presentation, effective tax rate calculation, and cash flow management, requiring careful consideration and disclosure in financial reporting.

What is Deferred Taxation

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Deferred taxation refers to the accounting treatment of income taxes payable or recoverable in future periods due to temporary differences between the financial accounting and tax bases of assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses. These temporary differences may arise from various factors, including differences in depreciation methods, inventory valuation, and recognition of revenue and expenses for financial reporting and tax purposes.

Importance of Deferred Taxation

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Deferred taxation has several implications for businesses and individuals:

  • Financial reporting: Deferred taxation affects the presentation of financial statements, including the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows, requiring accurate measurement, recognition, and disclosure in accordance with accounting standards and regulatory requirements.
  • Tax planning: Deferred taxation allows businesses and individuals to strategically manage tax liabilities and cash flow by deferring tax payments to future periods, optimizing tax planning strategies, and minimizing tax expenses over time.
  • Decision-making: Deferred taxation considerations influence financial decision-making processes, including investment analysis, capital budgeting, and financing decisions, as they impact after-tax cash flows, profitability, and overall financial performance.

How Deferred Taxation Works

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Deferred taxation arises from temporary differences between the carrying amounts and tax bases of assets and liabilities, which result in future taxable or deductible amounts when they reverse in subsequent periods. The accounting treatment of deferred taxation involves the following steps:

  1. Identification: Identify temporary differences between the financial accounting and tax bases of assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses that give rise to deferred tax liabilities or assets.
  2. Measurement: Measure the deferred tax liability or asset based on the enacted tax rates expected to apply when the temporary differences reverse and the tax consequences are realized or settled.
  3. Recognition: Recognize the deferred tax liability or asset in the financial statements, with deferred tax liabilities representing future taxable amounts and deferred tax assets representing future deductible amounts.
  4. Disclosure: Disclose information about deferred taxation in the financial statements, including the nature, amount, and timing of temporary differences, deferred tax liabilities, and deferred tax assets, as well as the valuation allowance and tax rate used in the calculation.

Examples of Deferred Taxation

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Examples of deferred taxation include:

  • Deferred tax liabilities: These arise from temporary differences that result in future taxable amounts, such as accelerated depreciation for tax purposes compared to straight-line depreciation for financial reporting purposes, leading to higher taxable income in future periods.
  • Deferred tax assets: These arise from temporary differences that result in future deductible amounts, such as unused tax credits or operating losses carried forward for tax purposes, leading to lower taxable income and potential tax savings in future periods.

Real-World Application

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Deferred taxation is commonly encountered in various industries and business sectors, including:

  • Manufacturing: Manufacturers may incur temporary differences related to inventory valuation methods, depreciation of machinery and equipment, and recognition of revenue and expenses for financial accounting and tax purposes.
  • Financial services: Financial institutions may experience temporary differences associated with loan loss provisions, fair value adjustments on investments, and recognition of interest income and expenses for financial reporting and tax purposes.
  • Technology: Technology companies may encounter temporary differences related to research and development expenses, intangible asset amortization, and stock-based compensation, impacting their effective tax rates and financial performance.


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Arti
AI Financial Assistant
Arti is a specialized AI Financial Assistant at Invezz, created to support the editorial team. He leverages both AI and the Invezz.com knowledge base, understands over 100,000... read more.