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Buy Google Stock

Are you eyeing up shares in Google? Or it’s parent company Alphabet? It’s important to make sure you’re clued up on the fundamentals of stock investing before taking the plunge. Which is why we’ve produced a series of easy to digest guides. If you’re ready to buy Google shares, we’ll show you different ways to get started. If you don’t think you’re ready yet, read on.

Buy Google shares, right now

Ready to invest in Google shares? Click on the links below to choose the online broker that works best for you. Our helpful guides detail the best investment choices, and how each of those choices work. 

24option
Key Features
Leader in Crypto CFDs
Cryptocurrency Education Centre
Easy to use Trading Platform
Min Deposit
$200
China
Start Trading View key features
Key Features
Leader in Crypto CFDs
Cryptocurrency Education Centre
Easy to use Trading Platform
Key Stocks
Payment Methods
Credit Card, Debit Card, Skrill
24Option is an online CFD broker providing an intuitive trading platform designed with the latest technological advancements that are geared towards new traders as well as professionals.
CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 81.27% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money

Trade Google shares, right now

Looking for an alternative to long-term investing? You can instead choose to trade shares of Google. The goal of trading is to bank shorter-term profits by buying and selling shares in a short time frame, sometimes even the same day. We’ve posted reviews for the best low-fee online brokers that suit this approach to trading.

Plus500
Key Features
Trade +2000 CFDs on Shares, Forex, Indices, Crypto, Options, Commodities & more
Unlimited risk-free Demo Account
0 commissions & attractive spreads with up to 1:5 leverage
Min Deposit
$100
China
Start Trading View key features
Key Features
Trade +2000 CFDs on Shares, Forex, Indices, Crypto, Options, Commodities & more
Unlimited risk-free Demo Account
0 commissions & attractive spreads with up to 1:5 leverage
Payment Methods
Credit Card, PayPal, Skrill, Bank Transfer
Plus500 is a leading provider of Contracts for Difference (CFDs), delivering Leveraged trading on +2,000 financial instruments, including Forex, Commodities, Indices, Shares, Options and Cryptocurrencies.
80.5% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
MintBroker
Key Features
Try RISK FREE with an $100K Virtual Account
Trade in real stocks
Trade U.S. Options for only $0.50 per contract
Min Deposit
$500
China
Start Trading View key features
Key Features
Try RISK FREE with an $100K Virtual Account
Trade in real stocks
Trade U.S. Options for only $0.50 per contract
Payment Methods
Neteller, Skrill, Bank Wire
Naga Markets
Key Features
100% secure trading platform - trade in real stocks
More than 100 exchanges all over the world
Operates in accordance with MiFID and member of ICF​
Min Deposit
$250
China
Start Trading View key features
Key Features
100% secure trading platform - trade in real stocks
More than 100 exchanges all over the world
Operates in accordance with MiFID and member of ICF​
Payment Methods
Credit Card, Debit Card, Wire Transfer, Skrill, Neteller, Giropay
Founded in 2015, NAGA is a Fintech company aimed at revolutionizing the world through decentralizing financial technology and providing access to the best market tools for everyone across the globe. Their team works tirelessly to provide the technology, resources, and support for every trader that needs to make confident trading decisions.

How to buy Google stock in 7 simple steps

Setting yourself up to make healthy gains by buying Google’s shares requires time and effort. Make sure to evaluate the company as well as Google’s stock before buying shares. 

When you’re just starting out, you’re best advised to buy Google shares online using a modest amount of capital. As you gain experience, you can invest more money and try out more complicated methods of trading. Here’s a quick checklist to work through as you consider buying Google’s stock.

  1. Know the company. What is Google? How did the company get off the ground? How did it become the powerhouse that it is today? How’s the company’s revenue and earnings growth? Is Google still innovating? The more you know about how Google operates, the more you’ll be to make smart investing decisions.
  2. Learn the basics. Including all the terminology that comes with buying shares – bid price and ask price, revenue growth and earnings growth, etc. Gem up on the different ways you can invest in Google’s stock, such as share-dealing, trading and contracts for difference (CFDs).
  3. Share-dealing vs Trading. Share-dealing involves buying shares in a company. You can make money from share-dealing in two different ways: Sell higher than you bought, or collect dividends (assuming it’s a company that issues dividends). Trading is a shorter-term approach to investing and can include buying and selling shares in a company on the same day (day trading). If you day-trade Google shares, you should be paying close attention to the stock’s chart rather than the company’s long-term financial future. 
  4. Set your budget. When you first start investing in stocks, it’s a good idea to start with a smaller budget, maybe £1000-£2000. Google’s parent company Alphabet currently trades around $1300 a share, meaning you could buy a single share with that sort of budget. As you gain experience, you can ramp up the size of your investments.
  5. Choose a broker. There’s no shortage of brokers that will allow you to sell and buy Google shares. Many of those brokers only charge a few dollars per trade. Find a broker with an easy-to-use trading platform, strong reputation and low fees.
  6. Analyse market conditions. When the market shoots higher over a period of months or years (a ‘bull market’) most stock, including Google shares prices go up too. When the market falls sharply (a ‘bear market’), most stocks fall too. When a bear market occurs, it’s generally a good idea to avoid taking unnecessary risks.
  7. Make your first investment. You’ve learned about Google’s business, and the basics of investing in stocks. You know your budget, you’ve found a broker you trust, and you’ve verified that the market is in good shape. It’s time to invest. Log into your online brokerage account, type in Google’s ticker symbol (GOOGL), make sure that the price the Google share is trading at isn’t too high, then hit the Buy button. Within seconds, you’ll own shares in Google.

Ways to invest in Google; share-dealing vs trading

There are numerous ways to buy, sell, and trade shares in Google online. Here are some of those ways:

Share-dealing

When share-dealing, you simply buy shares in a company. Share-dealing is usually a longer-term approach than trying to trade shares for a quick profit. 

  • Pros: You won’t need to dig too deep into chart reading and technical analysis. If Google’s shares start rising, holding for a longer period of time could land you a big gain.
  • Cons: Share-dealing can tie up your money for a long time, instead of having that money free to use for other investments. if Google’s stock starts plunging soon after you buy, it could be tough to stomach a major correction.

CFD trading

A CFD (contract for difference) is an investment derivative that allows you to speculate on the price movement of an asset (forex, commodities, Google’s stock) without actually owning that particular asset (in this case, shares of Google).  

  • Pros: With a CFD, you only need to put in a percentage of the total trade value, as the broker provides the rest, this is called leveraged trading. When you trade with leverage you stand to make more on your contract than if you’d only ventured your own money.
  • Cons: Leveraged trading is a double edged sword. Just as trading with leverage gives you a bigger gain if Google’s stock goes up, you’ll also lose more if Google’s stock goes down. Also, if you leave a leveraged CFD position open for more than a day, you’ll probably have to pay overnight fees. CFD trading makes more sense as an alternative to owning and storing gold bars or stacks of currency than it does for trading stocks, since you lose the voting rights and potential dividends that can come with owning shares.

The more you know, the better chance you’ll have of making money trading Google’s stock. Read our guides and courses to build your knowledge base. If you’re ready to jump into CFD trading, click on the links above. 

How to buy, sell and trade Google shares for beginners

Thinking to buy Google shares? Here’s what you need to know:

Buying shares

Generally, buying shares involves using an online broker. Buying shares is a good move for investors who want to hold onto a stock for a longer period of time. Log into your online brokerage account, type in the ticker symbol of the stock you want to purchase (Google’s ticker symbol is GOOGL), and click Buy. In just a second or two your purchase will be complete.

Selling shares

When selling Google shares, you want to sell at a higher price than the one at which you bought, earning you a profit. There are different approaches to selling. You could try to hold for as long as possible, hoping to get the biggest gain possible. Another option is to sell and take the gains you already have, especially if the broader financial markets are starting to lose steam.

Trading shares

When trading shares, you can choose the conventional approach using a typical online broker, or a more advanced approach by using a CFD broker. If you opt for a CFD broker, it’s important to know the risks that come with trading on leverage, as well as the extra fees that CFD brokers often charge.

Our top tips for investing in shares of Google

You now have a broad overview of how to invest in Google shares. Here are some key points to remember:

  1. Know your budget. Make sure you don’t invest more than you can afford to lose. While investing can be profitable, you don’t want to jeopardize your financial well-being to do it.
  2. Choose the approach that makes the most sense for you. Make sure the investment strategy you choose fits your investment goals and risk tolerance. As you gain experience, you’ll become better equipped to try more complex methods of investing.
  3. Stick to a logical plan, and don’t get swayed by emotion. By following a well-constructed investing plan, you’ll increase your likelihood of success. Don’t let emotions such as fear and greed cloud your judgment when making investing decisions.
  4. If market conditions change, be ready to react. When the stock market falls, you don’t need to fall with it. Keep prevailing market conditions in mind when making investing decisions, and be ready to pivot when needed.
  5. Learn from your mistakes. Novice investors make mistakes, and so do expert investors. The important thing is to learn from those mistakes. That way you can apply those lessons in the future, and find better results.

Unsure which platforms to use?

Still not sure how to proceed? We understand. Here’s a list of variables to consider as you decide what to do next on your investment journey:

  • Budget size. If you have a budget of a couple thousand dollars or less, keep things simple by just a single share Google. If you have a larger budget (say, more than $10,000), you have more options to work with. Those options can include day-trading, CFD trading, or buying a higher number of shares.
  • Risk assessment. As you become more experienced, you’ll be better able to cope with risk. Take the time to learn, so that the range of investing options widens for you. For instance, you can choose to sell shares of Google short. When you short-sell shares of a stock, you’re betting that the Google share price will fall. If you don’t feel ready to try that, you can always protect your investment on the buy side. If you buy shares of Google at $1300 per share, you can put in a stop-loss order at $1170. That way, if Google’s stock starts falling, you won’t lose more than 10% on your investment. 
  • Market conditions. If stocks skid into a declining market (bear market), defensive investment strategies such as bonds or commodities could work out better than buying growth stocks like Google. On the other hand, if the market’s doing well, take advantage by buying shares of Google. Follow the latest stock market news right here on our site to inform your decisions.
  • Set your investing goals. If you want to make money quickly, faster-moving trading techniques such as day-trading (buying and selling shares on the same day) could pay off for you. If your timeframe is more like 20 years, you can choose to buy shares of Google and then hold, placing your trust in the company’s long-term future.
  • Keep track of emerging trends. As new forms of technology reveal themselves, exciting new investment opportunities usually follow. In Google’s case, that applies to the proliferation of Internet services, where Google is an industry leader. Still, Google has competition in that space. Keep tabs on Google’s market position and growth trends, as a downturn in those fortunes would impact Google’s stock.

What is Google?

Google is an industry leader in the Internet services and products business, owned by parent company Alphabet Inc. Founded in 1998, Google’s meteoric supremacy in search engine capabilities have fuelled tremendous growth across multiple different industry niches. For more information on Google, including charts, live prices, analysis, and more, visit our Google share price page.

Try some of our stock market courses for beginners

Still not ready to invest? Start on our site, where you can learn about stock investment fundamentals with easy-to-understand educational courses. Learning the best investing and trading techniques will help prepare you for buying shares of Google.

Latest Google news

By Harry Atkins
Harry joined us in 2019 to lead our Editorial Team. Drawing on more than a decade writing, editing and managing high-profile content for blue chip companies, Harry’s considerable experience in the finance sector encompasses work for high street and investment banks, insurance companies and trading platforms.
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