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Boeing’s internal messages reveal its employees to have said that the 737 MAX was “Designed by Clowns”

Michael Harris
  • January 13th 2020, 22:15
  • Last Updated: January 13th 2020, 22:19
  • Boeing’s internal messages reveal its employees to have said that the 737 MAX was "Designed by Clowns".
  • Boeing 737 MAX is grounded since March 2019 following two fatal crashes that killed 346 people.
  • Boeing recently changed its stance and promised to make simulator training compulsory for pilots.

Boeing’s recently revealed documents contain multiple internal messages with harsh comments about the 737 MAX production. One such comment that particularly went viral stated that the plane was manufactured by clowns who were in turn supervised by monkeys.

On February 8th, 2018, during a flight some 8 months before the first fatal crash of the Boeing 737 Max, an employee asked his colleague, “Would you put your family on a MAX simulator trained aircraft? I wouldn’t.” The documents also reveal that the other employee responded “No” as well.

Boeing’s 737 Max Is Grounded Since March 2019

Following the two fatal 737 MAX crashes that killed 346 people in total on Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Airlines flights, the jetliner has been grounded till further notice from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

As per the revealed communication, Boeing has been found guilty of actively pursuing to avoid the time-consuming and expensive process of pilot simulator training that marks an absolute requirement for Boeing’s 737 MAX jetliner.

Boeing previously held a firm stance regarding computer-based training being sufficient for the 737 MAX as it resembles the 737 NG predecessor. Following FAA’s continued ban on the jetliner, however, Boeing has recently changed stance and announced that it will make simulator training compulsory for pilots before the 737 MAX returns for public flights.

Experts Anticipate Further Complications For Boeing Ahead

The messages accentuate a highly risky cost-cutting culture at Boeing that completely disregards the FAA’s standards. The recent developments, as per the experts, are likely to worsen the Boeing’s crisis and make it even harder for the plane manufacturer to ensure the return of its best-selling jetliner.

While the language of the revealed communication and the tone was disappointing for the FAA, it commented that the documents have not raised any further safety concerns. Boeing also commented on the recent documents and stated that the communications don’t, in any way, reflect the kind of company that it is or is aiming to be. Such a culture, the company reiterated, is totally unacceptable.

Boeing said that the communication was disclosed in an attempt to ensure transparency with the FAA. It, on the other hand, however, is likely to put an incredible pressure on Boeing’s CEO, David Calhoun, to make the required amendments in the company culture at large.

Having lost to Airbus in its battle of keeping the title of world’s largest plane manufacturer, Boeing is currently trading at $330 in the stock market that marks an almost 25% decline as compared to 2019’s high.

About the author

Michael Harris
Michael Harris
I began trading in my early 20's at a local company and since then have combined my knowledge and love of content to become a news writer. I am passionate about bringing insightful articles to readers and hope to add some value to your portfolios!

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