Amazon’s vice president resigns citing disappointment in the company’s decision of firing whistle-blowers

Amazon’s vice president resigns citing disappointment in the company’s decision of firing whistle-blowers
Written by:
Wajeeh Khan
5th May, 10:19
Updated: 5th May, 10:20
  • Amazon's VP resigns citing disappointment in the company’s decision of firing whistle-blowers.
  • France rejects Amazon’s request for government support to subsidize its furloughed employees.
  • The U.S retail giant hit its record-high of £1,989 per share in the stock market last week.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) vice president announced his resignation on Monday citing disappointment over the company’s decision of firing its workers for protesting against its labour practices.

AWS VP writes a blog post entitled “Bye, Amazon”

Tim Bray said in his blog post entitled “Bye, Amazon” that Friday was his last day at Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN). According to the executive, he was appalled by the retail giant’s decision of firing Maren Costa and Emily Cunningham for speaking against the work environment at Amazon and its health and safety measures to protect the warehouse workers from the fast-spreading COVID-19.

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Costa and Cunningham served Amazon as user experience designers. The company had justified its move last month citing repeated violation of Amazon’s internal policies as the reason for firing the two employees.

In his blog post, Bray wrote:

“I quit in dismay at Amazon firing whistle-blowers who were making noise about employees frightened of COVID-19. Remaining an Amazon VP would have meant, in effect, signing off on actions I despised. So, I resigned.”

AWS VP, however, refrained from commenting any further on his resignation. Amazon also refused to make an official statement on Bray’s resignation.

Bray was also a supporter of the advocacy group, Amazon Employees for Climate Justice.

France rejects Amazon’s request for government support

In separate news, Amazon also said on Monday that it will be extending the shutdown of its warehouses in France until May 8th inclusive. The U.S online retailer was seeking help from a state-funded scheme to financially support its employees that were furloughed after a French court ordered a temporary shutdown of Amazon’s six countrywide warehouses.

Amazon’s application for support to the French government, however, met with rejection on Monday. According to the French labour ministry:

“The request has been rejected because the closure of the sites is the consequence of a court ruling and not of a drop in activity.”

The court had also bound Amazon to restrict its deliveries to essential items only in France amidst the Coronavirus pandemic.

At £1,855 per share, Amazon is currently a little over 20% up year to date in the stock market. The tech giant hit its record-high of £1,989 per share last week that marked a roughly 45% recovery from its low of £1,348 per share in March.

Amazon is currently valued at £920 billion ($1.15 trillion) and has a price to earnings ratio of 110.63.

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