Ethereum developers are closing in on ETH 2

Written by: Ali Raza
November 2, 2020
  • Ethereum developers are closer than ever to launching Phase 0 of Ethereum 2.0.
  • Some initial preparations should commence later this week.
  • After the results of a recent audit, devs will be ready to 'pull the trigger on everything.'

A lot of Ethereum network’s fans and users were quite excited about the launch of Ethereum 2.0 in early 2020. Unfortunately, as everyone knows now, the launch never arrived. The developers had to postpone it yet again, which caused quite a bit of disappointment.

However, as the year comes to a close, it would seem that the delay was worth it, and that developers are finally getting quite close to the actual launch.

Ethereum 2.0 launch is approaching

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This was revealed in the latest blog post published by Ben Edgington, a developer from ConsenSys. Edgington suggests that Ethereum 2.0’s Phase 0 is on its way, and that the first part of the event will be the deployment of the deposit contract.

The deployment also saw a slight delay already, although developers had a good reason behind the decision. From what is known, they wanted to wait for a performance audit and blst — a security-focused signature library — to arrive first.

According to Edgington, the results will be seen at some point this week. However, there are still some improvements to be made.

Problems and solutions

Another thing that needs mentioning is that the project’s Medalla Beacon Chain testnet will soon be reinitialized. The move will come after a major, three-week-long hiatus caused by the inactivity of the validators.

As some may know, the network requires two-thirds of its validators to be online. Unfortunately, the network recently saw a drop to only 50% of them performing as required.

The solution was found, and in order to achieve the necessary number of validators, the inactive ones are being booted from the pool. The project plans to clean up, and make way for those who wish to actually participate.

Around 3,890 of them are waiting to exit, but fortunately, 9,426 are waiting for their chance to enter. Edgington noted that this problem comes due to the fact that the testnet is unincentivized. Basically, there is no cost to leaving.

One positive thing here is that this additional period gave client developers extra time to resolve technical problems regarding their software.